COMPANY NEWS

LOOK WHAT'S PULLED UP AT WEMOTO

IT'S A VINCENT RAPIDE SERIES C

InterestingVisitors
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Model: Vincent Rapide Series C
Years produced: 1949-1954
Engine: 998 cc, 50-degree V-twin
Power: 45-55hp
Top speed:115mph

One very lucky rider pulled up at Wemoto last week to buy a new set of handlebars for this iconic beauty. You might expect a bike of this rare kind to be sitting in a garage, looking overly polished and pristine - but not this one! Our visitor has had his bike for some 40 years now and, quite surprisingly, still uses it daily! A unique bike, and an even more unique owner.

Vincent Rapide Series C

Designed and built between 1949-1954 at the Vincent works in Hertfordshire, the Vincent Rapide was an iconic English post war motorcycle.

The appeal of the Vincent Series C was the ease in which its owners could (and still can in our visitor's case) work on it. With four stands attached to the bike, you could pretty much raise it up any way you wanted, while its quickly detachable wheels and a hinged rear mudguard made for easy tyre changes.

The bike was extremely modern for its time, with rear suspension, adjustable controls and an unusual dual seat. While buying one now could set you back a good £30,000 plus, buying it then was relatively no cheaper. But Vincent would never compromise on quality...

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A brief history of Vincent

Vincent Motorcycles manufactured bikes between 1928 to 1955. The company was founded  as Vincent HRD by Philip Vincent, who originally bought the name HRD from an already established manufacturer, HRD Motors Ltd.

Vincent produced many iconic motorcycles during its years, most in the late 30s and throughout the 40s.

Not wanting to be confused with the up and coming HD (Harley-Davidson), Vincent dropped 'HRD' in 1950 - which probably means that our visitor's bike was one of the first of its kind.

Although there was an increase in the production of cheaper bikes at this time, Vincent didn't want to compromise on the quality of his motorcycles and thus could not reduce his costs. This ultimately cost the company its life, with Vincent finally closing in 1956 due to heavy losses.

The company went into receivership in 1959 and its name and rights were taken over by Harper Engines Ltd. It has since been sold and bought by others.

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A member of the Wemoto team got to sit on it
Many years later...
In 1994, Bernard Li bought the Vincent name and started making plans to develop new Vincents. Sadly, he died before the first bike made it to production. Nothing has come of the Vincent brand since this last failed attempt and it's a shame.

There are few Vincents around today and even fewer that are still in everyday use. We're very happy to have seen one at our shop this week, and in such great condition!

news@wemoto.com
TOPICS: VINCENT
Posted by Daisy Cordell
for Wemoto News on 01 October 2015 in Company News

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